Podcamp Philly – my Sessions on Twitter and Old and New Media

I am really enjoying Podcamp Philly this year. Besides getting a chance to reconnect with Whitney Hoffman of LD Podcast, Mark and Jennifer from the culinary media network, Chris Penn from the Financial Aid Podcast, Mark Blevis, Matthew Ebel, (and a host of others that are now mad at me for not calling them out directly.)

In my session on “Twitter: Are we all just drinking the Kool Aid?” we explored the strawman notion that Twitter, even with about 2MM users, is only an early adopter tool that isn’t really worth the time people and brands are investing in it. Through discussion (with a very Twitter-heavy crowd) we helped several non-twitter users discover the potential value they’d find using Twitter. We heard stories of people finding answers, getting brand feedback, and we even had 2 people who had courted, and gotten engaged over Twitter.

In my discussion on “What Old Media can teach New Media” (which I usually run with Dean Landsman like we did at Social Media Camp NY), I had a great question and insight – As we discussed how one media tends not to replace the next one, but to cause it to change (as TV did to radio), someone asked about Enterprise 2.0. He noted that he’s trying to get people to adopt some of the new Enterprise 2.0 tech, but that they’re not replacing, say, Email, as the way people share information. We discussed how companies like Lotus added SameTime and MS has enterprise IM because of this. We discussed a few ways about how to get people to understand this “one doesn’t replace the other” situation and how to introduce things slowly and get adoption.

Finally, from Twitter: @KaraLaFleur: @howardgr talking about how web teams are the unrecognized rockstsrs if ad firms – & how that needs to change based on how pol use media.

Yes, we discussed how, if you’re going to talk Social Media with Advertisers, you have to know how they buy traditional media, because you may be teaching them a new paradigm (“ROI=Return on Influence vs. Reach and Frequency buy, for example). Speak to them in their language, and help them understand.

The event was well run, and the crowd was good as well. Thanks, Philly.

Social Media Club – 4 Missions and 4 Projects

As an Interium Advisory Group member for Social Media Club, I’ve chosen to work on the Media Literacy Project as described below.

4 Missions, 4 Projects: Social Media Club Gets to Work | Social Media Club

Media Literacy

Michael Brito is leading an effort to find and organize all the best Introduction to Social Media presentations, classes, discussions, cartoons, videos, blog posts etc… There are a lot of ‘here is what you need to know about social media‘ lists out there as well – where are they, which ones are the best. If you have some materials to submit, or if you run across some good material, can you please join this project by submitting your introduction to Social Media materials on the Social Media Club wiki.

I think this is a critical issue for children as well as customers of any company. We say “don’t believe everything you see online.” But how do we evaluate different content, research sources, and teach people how to be discriminating. Not only am I going to be involved in this effort at Social Media Club, but I’ve proposed this topic as a panel at the South By SouthWest Interactive Festival in Austin in 2009 (SXSW). If you support this idea, please consider voting for my panel. You’ll have to create a free account.

Slides from Social Media Camp NYC

Dean Landsman and I spoke at SocialMediaCampNYC yesterday, 8/7/08 to a packed house (according to David Berkowitz), on the subject of “What Old Media can teach New Media.”
Several folks asked for our slides, so here they are, via SlideShare.net.
Update: Chris Abraham provides a picture, and some Qik Video from the presentation as well.

And

UPDATE: Nice wrapup of Social Media Camp by Mogulette in the making Carmina Perez.

Can Social Media Go Local?

My latest article at INC.com’s Start Up Blog:
Social media marketing campaigns are often intended to reach large audiences. Marketing pros usually talk about Facebook, YouTube and online groups as tools for reaching broad swaths of potential customers. But for a business I recently came across, the desired result was to reach a small group of urban professionals in New York and get them interested in renting some apartments (read the rest)

Beyond Web 2.0 with the E.Factor at Philips in Eindhoven 6-25-08

The reason I’m in the Netherlands was an invitation by Adrie and Roeland Reinders and Marion Freijsen of the E.Factor to speak, along with Bill Sobel and two gentlemen from the Netherlands at a “Beyond Web 2.0” event. at the Philips Innovation Center (research labs) at Eindhoven.

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After a great drive out to Eindhoven, (thanks Martin), and some initial networking, I met Tom Paffen and Tom De Bryune who spoke on Venture Capital raising and on “Freaks and Geeks” as the leading indicators of where social media and social networking tech are heading as cultural and technical phenomenon.

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The photo set is on Flickr.

Bill and I spoke after the break. Bill did an excellent job talking about the “3 screen world” where TV, Computers and Smart Phones are the locations that people are using when they view and interact with content, all to different extents, of course. I chimed in afterward about how media companies are using Social Web tools to create new kinds of stories (like the Heroes show and related content), and also about how, as seems to come up in conversations a lot lately – destination sites are not the future. Having content everywhere, via syndication, mashup, widgets, and basically where your viewer, user, customer wants it, will be the future. The panel finished with questions and more networking.
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I know the slides and information on the panel, as well as the full video will soon be posted on Efactor.com and I’ll update with a link to that when it’s available.

BTW, Mashable did a brief review of the E.factor here.