Promoting Personal vs. Professional sites and posts

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I have a question for those of you who maintain more than one blog, as I do.

As many of you know:

  • I write regularly for Inc.com on the Start-Up Toolkit blog.
  • I have with the Harbrooke Group blog for my business.
  • This blog is for personal observations, and more for friends, though it is open to all.

I was recently talking with a client who also blogs for a major magazine as well as having a blog for her business, and we were exploring the ins and outs of when to link to which blog. We were discussing this issue, and I suggested we put our collective questions out to my audience.

Here are our questions:

  1. If we’re writing about a topic we’ve covered on both our own personal blog and the magazine’s blog, when is it okay to reference one of our personal blogs on our magazine blog? Is that too self-promotional?
  2. If we’re able to cross post items to both our own blog and the magazine at the same time (I’m not – I have to wait, per my contract), do we promote the magazine version or our site’s version on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.? What’s the difference, if you’ve got the exact same content?

The core issue here: as the web changes, do we still need to promote our  ‘home base’  even though people can find us from anywhere (our blog, magazine, Facebook, Linkedin, or wherever)?

Another caveat is that when we interview someone for our magazine blogs, they’re more interested in a link to the magazine’s site because of the visibility. However, the advantages of our own sites are that we can provide more material and different angles than we can fit on our magazine blogs.

There’s the idea of a “platform” here – a place to gather an audience outside of the magazine site – potentially for advertising, potentially for showing an audience to a publisher. (I may yet write a book one day.) Are we losing those opportunities if we point all the traffic to the magazine blog?

I tell my clients – “put stuff out there to be shared – as long as people know it came from you, who cares where they find it?” This is usually in the context of things like YouTube videos or other digital assets. Does the same hold for blogging?  Can we just put our stuff out there knowing people will know who we are in 2010?

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Full Disclosure – All that and a Bag of Chips

Over at the Harbrooke Group blog, I posted about a recent experience when I went to visit Pepsi. In light of the FTC discussion about bloggers and advertising disclosure, I felt it relevant to not only post about it there, but here too, and to make sure my sites have disclosure policies.

This is a “full disclosure” post of sorts. Today’s NY Times ran a piece about bloggers being influenced by Sponsors. I have no sponsors, but I felt it important to be more clear about an experience I had recently. (I’ve also added a disclosure page here and at https://howardgreenstein.com/blog/bio/disclosure – I used the template at DisclosurePolicy.Org to do so – quite useful.)

You can read the rest at All That and a bag of chips — Harbrooke Group – Social Media And…

Social Media Productivity Boosters

A very, very comprehensive list of tools and techniques for boosting  your social media productivity. So comprehensive, in fact, that I’m blogging this mostly so I can read some of the links at a later time. There are just too many – it would, ironically, make me unproductive to try to follow all this advice at once. .

How To Boost Your Social Media Productivity – A Guide For Busy People

In this post, we’ve put together a comprehensive list of articles with great advice, tips and tools to help you be more productive and efficient when using social media. We also have some posts that offer up general online productivity insights.

And, don’t forget to read the comments on the post – a few people have given their own suggestions. 

2 Reasons to Blog today – Blog Action Day and Creative Commons Awareness Day

Today, October 15th, is a do-something day online. Blog Action Day, supported by everyone from the UN to Friendster, is generating awareness of what everyday people can do to fight poverty, worldwide.

Creative Commons awareness is about letting people know they have a choice when they share their words, pictures, and images in public- they can limit how those media are used, or they can allow people to re-use them in specific ways that benefit everyone. (This article is (cc)2008 attribute-share alike).
Read more about these 2 great causes:

Blog Action Day 08

On October 15th bloggers everywhere will publish posts that discuss poverty in some way. By all posting on the same day we aim to change the conversation that day, to raise awareness, start a global discussion and add momentum to an important cause.

Be Common on October 15, 2008 | Social Media Club

October 15, 2008 represents the first opportunity to evangelize the importance of standards and move this mission forward in partnership with Creative Commons.

So what can YOU do to help create more awareness around the important service Creative Commons provides? There are 3 ideas which certainly would help which have been bantered around, but I suspect the community can come up with more by October 15th. The key theme is just to identify a way to let folks know about the best practices around the sharing/creating of creative works leveraging a Creative Commons License.

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